Archive for August, 2010

Cognates are wicked cool!

Tami Gollan wrote that in an e-mail discussion we were having about cognates and I love the line, so I borrowed it as my title–  and I agree, cognates are wicked cool! Read the rest of this entry »

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Some updates regarding bilingual aphasia

Its been a while since I posted- been really busy collecting and analyzing data with regards to bilingual aphasia!!
A few updates:
I am going to the Donostia workshop on bilingualism http://www.bcbl.eu/events/ in September which sounds really exciting and interesting!! Any one else going??

Our work on complexity has been in the news lately in Scientific American

Lastly, is there any published work on the issue of language attrition versus disuse? Are they one and the same thing (scientifically- I mean!)?
Till later- Swathi

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Does the home language matter?

So, I’ve been bemoaning the state of the art in bilingual speech-language pathology. I know there’s a reason that services for bilinguals are not always that great and that service providers are not that knowledgeable in this area; very few speech-language pathologists are bilingual. And fewer still have training in bilingualism. I think that it’s a good idea for everyone to get training in bilingualism whether or not they are bilingual because they will still be making decisions that affect the lives of people with communication impairments. Read the rest of this entry »

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On Not Being Bilingual

Read this story this morning, which I thought was interesting. A high school girl writes about not being bilingual in Chinese and English. She indicates that she used to be fluent, but has lost her home language–Chinese.

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A Little Knowledge can be Dangerous—and Stupid

Okay, so I’m going to bitch and moan. Skip this if you don’t want to hear it, but I can’t help myself. Every time that I start to think that people out there are more aware of language development, bilingualism, bilingual language impairment and so on, I get confirmation that no, that’s not the case. Don’t be stupid. That’s all I ask. Read the rest of this entry »

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Bilingual Test Development

Before, I wrote about different purposes for test development. Given those different test functions an implication is that the way we then develop tests for these should be different. Read the rest of this entry »

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Why Do We Test Bilinguals?

One of the themes that ran throughout all the presentations at the workshop was to know why we’re testing. And thus, to know why a given test is being developed (or selected). It’s important to know the purpose of testing in the first place. So, what are reasons people test bilinguals? What is it we need to know; and for what purpose?

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Is the Grass Greener??

The workshop on assessment of bilinguals in Gregynog was really interesting. There were researchers, students, and practitioners representing several disciplines including: speech-language pathology, psychology, linguistics, and reading. They were from different countries including: England, Wales, United States, Spain, Ireland, Netherlands, Greece among others. Many of these counties have official bilingual language policies (e.g., the Basque Country of Spain and Wales). One of the things that really struck me was that the challenges involved in assessment of bilinguals are very similar to what we face in the U.S. Somehow, I’d always assumed that the Europeans had it all figured out, especially since bilingualism is much more common than it is in the U.S. Read the rest of this entry »

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